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IN THE NEWS

    • 12/1
    • 2010
    • 9/27
    • 2010
    • Focusing On the Benefits of Healthy Eating
    • Conquest Magazine
    • Fruits and vegetables are “in,” along with the new “Optimizing Nutrition (ON) to Life Program” led by Joya Chandra, Ph.D. This multidisciplinary program works to promote healthy eating habits in pediatric patients and survivors. A focus group of patients and survivors will pilot a video game developed by Tom Baranowski, Ph.D, professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine, in coordination with Houston design studio Archimage. “Escape from Diab” is an interactive game aimed at preventing childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes through healthy eating and exercise.
    • View More: Focusing On the Benefits of Healthy Eating
    • 7/22
    • 2010
    • Adventure Video May Help Kids Dodge Diabetes
    • Agricultural Research
    • In the action-packed video game “Escape From Diab,” kids break free from the evil, diabetes-inducing Kingdom of Diab by making wise food choices. The fast-paced, educational-yet-entertaining game is the work of Tom Baranowski, professor of pediatrics and specialist in behavioral nutrition, and colleagues at the ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. His results from testing the video with 153 young volunteers should be ready to report later this year.
    • View More: Adventure Video May Help Kids Dodge Diabetes
    • 7/5
    • 2010
    • Diabetes and Games with a Theoretical Base
    • NurseTim TUBE
    • Patient education in the 21st century is looking very different than it did even 5 years ago. As we develop patient education activities for our students, we need to consider how these changes will affect their practice. From social networking to PDAs to video games, clients from all generations are looking in many different directions to find information to help them obtain optimal health.
    • View More: Diabetes and Games with a Theoretical Base
    • 3/10
    • 2010
    • Surfing the Net with Kids
    • The Boston Globe
    • The food pyramid is a nutrition and activity guide published by the United States Department of Agriculture. It contains eight divisions: physical activity (represented by the person climbing the side of the pyramid), grains, vegetables, fruits, oils, milk, and meat and beans (representing all forms of lean protein.) Learn more at this week’s crop of freshly picked sites.
    • View More: Surfing the Net with Kids